I cared for you in the wilderness, in the land of drought.  As they had their pasture, they became satisfied, and being satisfied their heart became proud; therefore, they forgot Me.  Hosea 13:5-6

The quality of our relationship with God can be determined by how much we think we need Him.  If we perceive the need to be great, we draw close.  If things are going well, it’s easy to retreat into a default stance of emotional distance.  Our response to green pastures numb us out to the One who saved us.

Why is this?

1. We don’t like being in need.  Neediness put us out of our comfort zone but when things are tough, we don’t have a choice.  We bite the bullet and run home, believing subconsciously that our need is only temporary.  As soon as things turn around, we can go back to a form of self-sufficiency that feels far more dignified.

2. Intimacy scares us and admitting our need strips us of all pretense.  We know God is seeing each of us as we really are.

3. I don’t like powerlessness.  The wilderness is unforgiving and reminds us that we do not have control over any of its elements.  We are forced into a position of acknowledging that we need someone more powerful to survive.

None of us like to feel used; people only come to us when they need something.  Their flattery is a means to an end.  Could God feel like this when His children only warm up when the fires are hot?  At that point, I may as well say that God is utilitarian – the ‘fixer’ when I’m in a tough spot.  Getting older begins to teach a lot valuable lessons.  One that has surprised me is this ~ My best times with God are when I set out to enjoy him on a good day.

I used to run to You as a beggar child.  You invite me in all kinds of weather.  I celebrate our union.  Amen

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